Losing Control on Turns

As you know if you ride, balance is critical to operating a motorcycle. Most bikes have both front and rear brake controls, but motorcycles can corner quickly and you shouldn't use the brakes during a turn. Poorly coordinated braking and turning can lead to you losing control of the motorcycle. If you are new to motorcycle riding, it’s important to remember that you should brake and slow down before you enter the turn. Once you are actually in the turn, you should accelerate through it. If you lose control in a turn and wipe out or encounter another hazard and are hurt, you should contact a trustworthy Maine motorcycle accident attorney to determine whether you can seek compensation.

Filing an Insurance Claim

In terms of insurance, Maine is a "fault" state. This means that you can seek compensation from anyone legally at fault for your motorcycle accident. If you lose control in a turn and are injured, you may be able to file a claim with your own insurer to recover compensation for some or all of your injuries. Motorcyclists in Maine are required to purchase an insurance policy with a set minimum amount of motorcycle accident coverage. The policy you purchase must provide $50,000 for one person's injury or death, $100,000 for a single accident that hurts or kills more than one individual, and $25,000 for property damage. If your insurer denies your claim, you may want to consult an attorney to look over your insurance policy and see whether you have any recourse.

Hazards on the Road

Oftentimes, losing control in a turn is not a motorcyclist's fault. Even if you're an experienced rider who has braked before entering a turn and accelerated into it, you can be taken unaware by oil spilled on the road or an extremely uneven surface that causes you and your motorcycle to capsize. The owner of the road, often a city or municipality, is responsible for keeping the road in good order or putting up a sign if there is a known hazard. You may be able to file a lawsuit against the owner of the road, such as a municipality, on the basis of negligence if you can show (1) it owed you a duty of reasonable care, (2) it breached that duty, (3) the breach was the proximate cause of the accident, and (4) damages resulted.

For example, suppose a municipality has been doing construction work on the side of a road that is not frequently traveled late at night, and its construction work involves the use of oil. One of the workers accidentally lets a small amount of oil spill on a curve in the road before going home late one night. The worker assumes that because so few people travel the road (and because the oil would not present a hazard to a car), he can put up a sign or clean it the following morning. If you are riding your motorcycle on that road early the next morning and the motorcycle's wheels lose their grip on the road because of the unexpectedly oily surface in the turn, you may have a cause of action for negligence against the municipality and the construction company. Note that special rules may apply to taking legal action against a government entity; an experienced injury attorney can help you navigate these standards.

Helping You Recover After a Motorcycle Accident

If you are injured after losing control of your bike, you should retain a trustworthy Maine motorcycle injury attorney to help you obtain the compensation you are eligible for under the law for your injuries. We can figure out what caused the accident and join all responsible parties to your lawsuit. Contact Peter Thompson & Associates at 800.804.2004 or via our online form to set up your free initial consultation.

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